The Classical World

A place to relax and enjoy all things ancient Greek and Roman, presided over by an enthusiast of the Classics.

archaicwonder:




Greek intaglio ring of Alexander the Great, Hellenistic, c. 2nd-1st Century BC
The carnelian stone is engraved with a profile head of Alexander the Great in the guise of Herakles wearing the lion’s skin, the jaws pulled up over his head with the paws tied at the neck, set in the original gold ring. The intaglio’s style imitates the famous Tetradrachms of Alexander the Great. Dating from the 2nd to 1st century BC,  this ring is close to the great general’s reign, making it a prized and unique piece. 

archaicwonder:

Greek intaglio ring of Alexander the Great, Hellenistic, c. 2nd-1st Century BC

The carnelian stone is engraved with a profile head of Alexander the Great in the guise of Herakles wearing the lion’s skin, the jaws pulled up over his head with the paws tied at the neck, set in the original gold ring. The intaglio’s style imitates the famous Tetradrachms of Alexander the Great. Dating from the 2nd to 1st century BC,  this ring is close to the great general’s reign, making it a prized and unique piece. 

greek-museums:

Archaeological Site of Eretria/ House of Mosaics:

Mosaics from the House of Mosaics. (Hellenistic)

I would have liked to have taken some better pictures, but works in the site are still in progress so it can become a unified tourable archaeological site- there is also a stadium, a theater and several residences. The House of Mosaics is actually housed inside a small building which cannot be visited, and I had to take a picture from behind a glass door.

Still you can see that it is a mosaic in the macedonian style, with the designs rendered in colourful pebbles. There are several floral motifs, scenes with lions, griffins and sphinxes, as well as an armed nereid on a seahorse.

*It might look as if I used my camera’s flash, but I didn’t- I just brightened it a bit in photoshop. Never use flash while photographing antiquities. All museums and sites ban flash photography.

drachengarnet:

l4xord:

classicsenthusiast:

I decided to throw my cheat sheet for ancient Greek out there, a small description of case uses (for beginners).
Not pictured - Vocative:
Spoken directly (e.g. “Socrates, I want to kill you.”)

Σώκρατες, θέλω σε ἀποθνήσκειν

Aw damn, I thought this was for Latin for a sec and got so excited.

I’d be happy to make one for Latin as well :)

drachengarnet:

l4xord:

classicsenthusiast:

I decided to throw my cheat sheet for ancient Greek out there, a small description of case uses (for beginners).

Not pictured - Vocative:

Spoken directly (e.g. “Socrates, I want to kill you.”)

Σώκρατες, θέλω σε ἀποθνήσκειν

Aw damn, I thought this was for Latin for a sec and got so excited.

I’d be happy to make one for Latin as well :)

l4xord:

classicsenthusiast:

I decided to throw my cheat sheet for ancient Greek out there, a small description of case uses (for beginners).
Not pictured - Vocative:
Spoken directly (e.g. “Socrates, I want to kill you.”)

Σώκρατες, θέλω σε ἀποθνήσκειν

l4xord:

classicsenthusiast:

I decided to throw my cheat sheet for ancient Greek out there, a small description of case uses (for beginners).

Not pictured - Vocative:

Spoken directly (e.g. “Socrates, I want to kill you.”)

Σώκρατες, θέλω σε ἀποθνήσκειν

ancientcoins:

artofthedarkages:

A Roman solidus with a portrait of the emperor Julian the Apostate on the front, and a soldier holding a standard and dragging a captive barbarian on the reverse.

Minted out of gold.

Made in the 360s at Constantinople. Gifted to the Metropolitan Museum in 1898 by Joseph H. Durkee, a Floridan politician.

This solidus of Julian was minted in Constantinople between 361 and 363. Though Julian is best known as being the “apostate,” the emperor who attempted to restore paganism after it was cast into disfavor first by Constantine, and subsequently by his son Constantius II, Julian should be equally recognized as a strong and successful military leader. This coin’s reverse celebrates the virtus exercitus romanorum, the military virtue of the Romans, and depicts a soldier with a defeated barbarian. Were this coin earlier, it would be likely that that captive would represent Julian’s victories against the Gauls, Franks, and Germans in the 350s. However, the date of this coin in the early 360s means that this captive is almost certainly a Persian soldier. Julian fought the early part of this campaign to great success. He and his army very nearly took the Persian capital of Ctesiphon, but Julian was fatally wounded in 363, and consequently never took the city. This coin represents the optimism that his early victories conveyed to the Romans.

greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Eretria:

Banqueting platters.(Classical)

The first one was for serving fish. The dip in the center was for serving some type of broth or sauce along with the fish.

I was tagged by augustus-be-damned

1. What’s your name? Abbey

2. When is your birthday? Feb 24th

3. Where are you from? N/A

4. Have a crush? Currently in a long-term relationship, so yes

5. What’s your favourite color? Purple

6. Write something in caps: MARTIAL>CATULLUS

7. Got a favourite band/artist?  OOR

8. Favourite number? 72

9. Favourite drink?  Coconut-flavored Italian Cream Soda

10. Tag Ten People: thoodleoo, haru-mejiro, plinycapybara, … whoever wants, to, I suppose?