The Classical World

A place to relax and enjoy all things ancient Greek and Roman, presided over by an enthusiast of the Classics.

tiny-librarian:

The most famous woman in Roman history was not a Roman. Cleopatra - that was her name - was queen of Egypt. Then was she an Egyptian? No, she was a Greek. Sounds like a muddle. But let’s try to straighten it out by looking at some facts. These facts are not easy to come by. Yet scarcity of information has not stopped people from creating a great many poems, plays, novels, biographies, and movies about Cleopatra.
Ten Queens, Portraits of Women of Power - Milton Meltzer

tiny-librarian:

The most famous woman in Roman history was not a Roman. Cleopatra - that was her name - was queen of Egypt. Then was she an Egyptian? No, she was a Greek. Sounds like a muddle. But let’s try to straighten it out by looking at some facts. These facts are not easy to come by. Yet scarcity of information has not stopped people from creating a great many poems, plays, novels, biographies, and movies about Cleopatra.

Ten Queens, Portraits of Women of Power - Milton Meltzer

archaicwonder:

Roman Tinned Copper Cavalry Parade Helmet, c. Late 2nd-Early 3rd century AD

Formed of hammered sheet, with arching crest terminating in a beaked griffin’s head, its talons holding a Medusa mask in front, the griffin’s body tapering to a dolphin-like tail, each side decorated in high relief with a capricorn with griffin-like head and coiled tail, the three creatures with rivets for ears (now missing), with continuous flanged rim to protect the wearer’s brow and ears, the rim decorated with friezes of punched circles and dots, two rivets at the front of the brow-guard with remains of a hinge inside for a face-mask attachment.

Classical Greek Greetings

somepoorsod:

classicsenthusiast:

As most students of Classical Greek know, you can learn the language, read much of the writings available to us, and still have no clue how in the world the ancient Greeks said hello/goodbye. 

However, although not often explicitly taught, we do know some common greetings from the Classical world. Here are some in Greek: 

Ἀσπάζομαι (Aspazomai) - a verb meaning to greet or welcome kindly, can be simply used to mean “Greetings!” or “Welcome!”

More commonly, however, Kaire (Χαῖρε) is used, Kairete when referring to a group of people. This is generic way of conveying greetings, and can be added to with adjectives of amounts, such as Polla (πολλά) which means much, many. 

Other greetings may include sayings such as “hope you are well!” or “how you doin?”

εὔχομαι σε ὑγιαίνειν (eukomai se ugiainein) “I pray you to be well”

Πῶς ἐχεῖς; (Pos Ekeis) “How are you doing?” 

Πράσσεις; (Prasseis?) “How are you? [Koine]”

And to say goodbye was also often a wish for the good health of the other party, as in:

ἔρρωσο (Erroso) “Be well/strong!” (pl. ἔρρωσθε)

or

εὐτύχει (Eutukei) “Be prosperous!” (pl. εὐτυχεῖτε)

Most information found at this helpful site (also has Latin)

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I have always taken great joy in the part of the Frogs where they flag down Kharon:

χαῖρ᾽ ὦ Χάρων, χαῖρ᾽ ὦ Χάρων, χαῖρ᾽ ὦ Χάρων

theancientworld:

A fresco from the thermopolium of Lucius Vetutius Placidus in the city of Pompeii, depicting the spirit (genius) of the house central, flanked by Lares and Penates with Mercury on far left, Bacchus far right.

theancientworld:

A fresco from the thermopolium of Lucius Vetutius Placidus in the city of Pompeii, depicting the spirit (genius) of the house central, flanked by Lares and Penates with Mercury on far left, Bacchus far right.

“And why get angry at Helen?
As if she singlehandedly destroyed those
multitudes of men.
As if she all alone
made this wound in us.”

– Klytaimestra in Aiskhylos’s Agamemnon, translated by Anne Carson (via elucipher)