The Classical World

A place to relax and enjoy all things ancient Greek and Roman, presided over by an enthusiast of the Classics.

ancientart:

Askos with painted scenes and applied figures. 

Dating to about 270-200 BCE, this askos was found at Cuma in Campania, Italy, and was made at Canosa, Apulia (modern Puglia).

Vessels of this type were evidently not intended to be functional, and were often made to be placed inside tombs. The British Museum houses another Canosan vessel shaped like a head, which you may view hereCanosa was a highly important city of ancient Apulia, which, although influenced by the Greeks, was able to maintain its local culture through to Roman times.

This vase is basically an askos, a simple globular spouted vessel of a shape found in Italy for over two millennia. By the Hellenistic period askoi were over-burdened with a wealth of decoration. This example has two winged horses flying over a brown sea on a pink background. Three winged figures of Nike or Victory stand on the false spouts and handle, and foreparts of horses spring from the body of the vessel. The applied reliefs depict a winged head of the gorgon Medusa and a dancing maenad, a follower of Dionysos. (BM)

Courtesy of & currently located at the British Museum, London, GR 1862.7-12.2. Photos taken by SpirosK photography.

imnova:

classicsenthusiast:

Because, as we all know, being jealous of the gods is your first step toward getting your own play.

I’m quite sure that jealousy of the gods means the gods getting jealous of mortals’ good fortune and, before the men can think themselves equal to them, working to set their head straights by sending terrible disgraces to the once-fortunate people.

You are probably correct. I stick by my statement that that starts off many a play and/or myth, however.

imnova:

classicsenthusiast:

Because, as we all know, being jealous of the gods is your first step toward getting your own play.

I’m quite sure that jealousy of the gods means the gods getting jealous of mortals’ good fortune and, before the men can think themselves equal to them, working to set their head straights by sending terrible disgraces to the once-fortunate people.

You are probably correct. I stick by my statement that that starts off many a play and/or myth, however.

greek-museums:

National Archaeological Museum, Athens:

A Panathenaic amphora with a depiction of a winged Nike (Victory) watching a wrestling match waiting to crown the victor.
These amphoras were given as prizes in the Panathenaic Games. Depending on the sport and the victory, a winner could receive from 4 of these amphoras to 40 of them- all filled with 36 kilos of olive oil. The athlete could then trade this oil- and the amphoras. The oil was sold all over the Mediterranean and it was especially sought after by young athletes.

See more panathenaic amphoras here.

greek-museums:

National Archaeological Museum, Athens:

A Panathenaic amphora with a depiction of a winged Nike (Victory) watching a wrestling match waiting to crown the victor.

These amphoras were given as prizes in the Panathenaic Games. Depending on the sport and the victory, a winner could receive from 4 of these amphoras to 40 of them- all filled with 36 kilos of olive oil. The athlete could then trade this oil- and the amphoras. The oil was sold all over the Mediterranean and it was especially sought after by young athletes.

See more panathenaic amphoras here.

artofthedarkages:

A Roman coin with a bust of the empress Aelia Flaccilla on the front, and Victory seated and pointing to a shield decorated with a Christological monogram on top of a column. 
Minted out of bronze. 
Made in the 380s at Heraclea in the Eastern Roman Empire.
Currently held at the Edgar L. Lowen Gallery.

artofthedarkages:

A Roman coin with a bust of the empress Aelia Flaccilla on the front, and Victory seated and pointing to a shield decorated with a Christological monogram on top of a column. 

Minted out of bronze. 

Made in the 380s at Heraclea in the Eastern Roman Empire.

Currently held at the Edgar L. Lowen Gallery.

greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Eretria:

The first building for the archaeological museum of Eretria was built in 1961 in order to house the finds from the area that until then were stored in a small warehouse in Eretria. The most important finds included the sculptures from the west pediment of the temple of Apollo that until then had been moved to the Archaeological Museum of Chalkis, while others had been moved to the National Archaeological Museum for their safety. A great number of important finds from the site of Eretria were also smuggled abroad and are now in various foreign museums.

The museum was renovated during a period between 1983-1991 and a new wing was added to accomodate the continuing excavations that were also performed in association with the Swiss School of Archaeology and the British School. The site and the museum are under the IA’ (11th) Ephorate of Antiquities.

The museum of Eretria has many beautiful and important exhibits, but it suffers a bit in the way all these are displayed. Museums attached to archaeological sites are not uncommon in Greece. Most of these structures were built rather hastily in order to accomodate excavations and protect the sites from further looting by putting effectively their presence as a seal of origin to these artifacts. Naturally with the progress of excavations the collection would expand and many exhibits that to my opinion would need a display all to themselves, or even a seperated area, are getting lost within the confined space.

archaicwonder:

Greek Gold Thigh Band, c. Late 4th Century BC

With braided chain of cylindrical section terminating at each end in the head of a woman with melon coiffure and collar of beads and tongues, the clasp in the form of a Herakles Knot with central rosette and ends terminating in lion heads.