onthecausewaytoneverwhere asked:

I heard there was a Greek verb that roughly translates to "to have a good day fishing". I made the hard choice of latin over Greek and was wondering if you could shed some light on this. Thanks!

Well, there are plenty of words in Greek which relate to fishing, mostly because fishing was a big part of life in ancient Greece (and modern Greece, as well!).

For example: δυσαγρέω (dysagreo) means to “have bad sport in fishing”

and ἐπαγροσύνη (epagrosyne) means “good luck in fishing”

There are even specific words for those who catch fish in specific ways, and for people who sell different kinds of fish!

Words like this are so prevalent in Greek both because of the necessity for such words in a culture where fish is a main protein source and because of Greek’s ability to combine words so easily.

Greek as a language is very adaptable, and prefixes, suffixes, and conjoined words were a major part of the language in ancient times. So finding words that mean very specific things, especially in concern to fishing (or battle or sex), is understandable.

archaeologicalnews

Predators and Prey: A Roman Mosaic from Lod, Israel

archaeologicalnews:

image

One of the oldest surviving complete Roman mosaics dating from 1,700 years ago, a spectacular discovery made in Lod in Israel, will go on show at Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire, UK. The exhibition Predators and Prey: A Roman Mosaic from Lod, Israel is presented in association with the Israel Antiquities Authority and in collaboration with the British Museum, from 5 June – 2 November 2014.

Measuring eight metres long and four metres wide, and in exceptional condition, the Lod mosaic depicts a paradise of birds, animals, shells and fishes, including one of the earliest images of a rhinoceros and a giraffe, richly decorated with geometric patterns and set in lush landscapes. Read more.

It’s that time of the semester, and…

I’m much more behind on work right now than I meant to be. Which means that, although I’ll still be doing my regular posts on mythology and words of the day and reblogs, I won’t have very much time to address questions and more complex requests.

In three weeks, ask me whatever you want and I’ll be sure to get to it ASAP.

I’m very sorry, and if I have any extra time whatsoever I will help in any way that I can. 

Thank you all for being such great followers. I really do appreciate all of your asks and your confidence in my knowledge, and I promise that I’ll do all that I can up until my finals :)

Have a great week!

athens-archaeological-museum

athens-archaeological-museum:

West pediment of the temple of Asklepios from Epidaurus (ca 380 B.C)

The pediment depicts the fight between the Amazons and the Greeks before the walls of Troy. Though in a highly fragmentary state of preservation, the central mounted figure might be queen Penthesilea fighting off two Greek soldiers- one of them Machaon, son of Asklepios.

Penthesilea is flanked by two more Amazons- on horse and on foot. Slain soldiers have fallen to the ground, while a dead Amazon is still on her horse.

archaicwonder
archaicwonder:

Pegsus and Swastika, Silver Stater of Corinth c. 550-500 BC



Coin shows Pegasos (Pegasus), with curved wing, flying to left, a koppa below. On the reverse, an incuse in the form of a swastika.
Very rare. This is one of the finest of all archaic Corinthian staters known. Instead of walking, as on the earliest examples of this type, Pegasos is clearly flying here since all his hooves are diagonal and not flat on the ground. The swastika patterned incuse on the reverse is actually a very ancient solar symbol, found in many parts of the world, and has no political meaning.
The ancient city of Corinth was founded in the 10th century BC on the remnants of a Neolithic settlement. The town was extremely well situated on the isthmus that joins the Peloponnesus with the mainland of Greece. This location gave Corinth the possibility to control all roads connecting the two parts of Greece. As a result, Corinth soon developed into one of the most important trade centers of the ancient world.
Thanks to this vivid trade, Corinth belonged to the first western towns to take up coinage, supposedly around the middle of the 6th century BC. The motif on the coins of Corinth was Pegasus, the legendary winged horse – legend had it that Pegasus, scratching with his hoof on the rock Acrocorinthus, had released the spring of Peirene, the fountain that supplies Corinth with fresh water. The reverse of the early Corinthian coins showed a simple square, the so-called “quadratum incusum.” Soon however, the square was transformed into a swastika, as can be seen on this coin.

archaicwonder:

Pegsus and Swastika, Silver Stater of Corinth c. 550-500 BC

Coin shows Pegasos (Pegasus), with curved wing, flying to left, a koppa below. On the reverse, an incuse in the form of a swastika.

Very rare. This is one of the finest of all archaic Corinthian staters known. Instead of walking, as on the earliest examples of this type, Pegasos is clearly flying here since all his hooves are diagonal and not flat on the ground. The swastika patterned incuse on the reverse is actually a very ancient solar symbol, found in many parts of the world, and has no political meaning.

The ancient city of Corinth was founded in the 10th century BC on the remnants of a Neolithic settlement. The town was extremely well situated on the isthmus that joins the Peloponnesus with the mainland of Greece. This location gave Corinth the possibility to control all roads connecting the two parts of Greece. As a result, Corinth soon developed into one of the most important trade centers of the ancient world.

Thanks to this vivid trade, Corinth belonged to the first western towns to take up coinage, supposedly around the middle of the 6th century BC. The motif on the coins of Corinth was Pegasus, the legendary winged horse – legend had it that Pegasus, scratching with his hoof on the rock Acrocorinthus, had released the spring of Peirene, the fountain that supplies Corinth with fresh water. The reverse of the early Corinthian coins showed a simple square, the so-called “quadratum incusum.” Soon however, the square was transformed into a swastika, as can be seen on this coin.

mythologer
bayoread:

hellenismo:

Τρίτη Μεσοῦντος/ Τρισκαιδεκάτη/ Τρίτη ἐπὶ δέκα, XIII dayFrom today’s sunset: thirteenth day of Mounychion.(Kronos devouring a horse, Rhea seated near Him. Christie’s, London, Catalogue des pierres graves antiques de S.A. le Prince Stanislas Poniatowski ([1830?]-1833), 5, Cornelian)

Kronos devouring an ass more like.
Rhea is like “Er..?”

bayoread:

hellenismo:

Τρίτη Μεσοῦντος/ Τρισκαιδεκάτη/ Τρίτη ἐπὶ δέκα, XIII day
From today’s sunset: thirteenth day of Mounychion.

(Kronos devouring a horse, Rhea seated near Him. Christie’s, London, Catalogue des pierres graves antiques de S.A. le Prince Stanislas Poniatowski ([1830?]-1833), 5, Cornelian)

Kronos devouring an ass more like.

Rhea is like “Er..?”

archaeologicalnews

Ancient Roman theatre discovered in Florence

archaeologicalnews:

image

Florence, April 14 - Archaeologists digging up the remains of an ancient Roman theatre discovered under the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence have found a “vomitorium” or corridor used by as many as 15,000 theatre goers in the first and second centuries A.D., city officials say.

The latest find at the site in the centre of the Tuscan capital includes the original painted stone pavements along which spectators used to walk from the outer circle of the theatre to the orchestra pit, which already had been excavated during previous digs. Also discovered were well shafts going as deep as more than 10 metres below the current surface of Florence, providing water and waste disposal for the theatre, as well as remains of the foundations of the walls used to build the Salone dei Cinquecento. Read more.

c-aesarion
the-fault-in-marys-life:

peashooter85:

Vespasian and the Year of Four Emperors,
The 14 year rein of Nero had been disastrous for the Roman Empire, bankrupting the Imperial Treasury, creating an atmosphere of corruption, incompetence, and lawlessness within government, and sparking rebellions all over the vast Roman world. The death of Nero plunged the empire into civil war as various Roman warlords and strongmen attempted to fill the power vacuum that Nero once filled.  The year was 68 AD, almost 100 years since the death of Mark Antony and the last Roman Civil War.  During the period between 68 and 69 AD there were four emperors on the Imperial throne (Galba, Otho, Vitellius, Vespasian), each vying for power as Roman Emperor, and each quickly defeating each other to only in turn become the defeated.
By 69 AD the empire was near collapse, and it seemed that the Roman world would fall with it.  In the meantime Vespasian had just finished quelling a rebellion in Judea, a rebellion which led to the destruction of Jerusalem and the Jewish Temple.  A general famous for a lifetime of victories, he had a large, well equipped, well trained, and well disciplined army.  Sweeping from the east Vespasian ended the civil war by crushing the various factions that were dividing up the Empire.  He was proclaimed Emperor by the Senate on the 1st of July, 69 AD.
During his imperial reign Vespasian would restore the fractured empire, revitalizing the Roman economy, bring discipline and order to the military, purging the government and civil service of corruption and incompetence,  and end the various rebellions and invasions that were occurring at the empires borders.  Today his legacy is best known as the emperor who began the building of the Colosseum.  He died in 79 AD at the age of 70.

I definitely love this historical period. I mean look at the Greatness of Rome. This is the great beauty.Ohh I could read loads of stuff about this *gets emotional*

the-fault-in-marys-life:

peashooter85:

Vespasian and the Year of Four Emperors,

The 14 year rein of Nero had been disastrous for the Roman Empire, bankrupting the Imperial Treasury, creating an atmosphere of corruption, incompetence, and lawlessness within government, and sparking rebellions all over the vast Roman world. The death of Nero plunged the empire into civil war as various Roman warlords and strongmen attempted to fill the power vacuum that Nero once filled.  The year was 68 AD, almost 100 years since the death of Mark Antony and the last Roman Civil War.  During the period between 68 and 69 AD there were four emperors on the Imperial throne (Galba, Otho, Vitellius, Vespasian), each vying for power as Roman Emperor, and each quickly defeating each other to only in turn become the defeated.

By 69 AD the empire was near collapse, and it seemed that the Roman world would fall with it.  In the meantime Vespasian had just finished quelling a rebellion in Judea, a rebellion which led to the destruction of Jerusalem and the Jewish Temple.  A general famous for a lifetime of victories, he had a large, well equipped, well trained, and well disciplined army.  Sweeping from the east Vespasian ended the civil war by crushing the various factions that were dividing up the Empire.  He was proclaimed Emperor by the Senate on the 1st of July, 69 AD.

During his imperial reign Vespasian would restore the fractured empire, revitalizing the Roman economy, bring discipline and order to the military, purging the government and civil service of corruption and incompetence,  and end the various rebellions and invasions that were occurring at the empires borders.  Today his legacy is best known as the emperor who began the building of the Colosseum.  He died in 79 AD at the age of 70.

I definitely love this historical period. I mean look at the Greatness of Rome.
This is the great beauty.
Ohh I could read loads of stuff about this *gets emotional*